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Earthwatch 2: Project ASCO

One of the reasons I selected this particular Earthwatch expedition was that it involved studies of both forest and ocean, which are my two favorite ecosystems here at home. I wanted to compare what I'm familiar with to similar habitats on the opposite coast. Regarding the rocky intertidal, I had been warned not to expect the spectacular biodiversity I'm used to on the Pacific coast, and that warning turned out to be quite a propos.

Along the California coast the rocky intertidal is an explosion of colors and textures, especially during the growing season. See this at Pigeon Point:

Ocean and seaweed-covered rocks
Rocky intertidal at Pigeon Point, San Mateo County, California
2022-06-01
© Allison J. Gong

and this at Asilomar:

Ocean and seaweed-covered rocks
Rocky intertidal at Asilomar, Monterey County, California
2022-06-03
© Allison J. Gong

And this is what you see when you walk—or in the case at Pigeon Point, climb down—to the site. It just is this varied, with several algae that are easily recognizable as being different even if you don't know what their scientific names are.

Contrast that with the rocky intertidal at Frazer Point on the Schoodic Peninsula:

Coastline with small rocks covered with golden-brown seaweed
Mounds of Ascophyllum nodosum at Frazer Point on the Schoodic Peninsula
2022-06-17
© Allison J. Gong

All of the algae covering these rocks are rockweeds, and most of it is Ascophyllum nodosum. One of the projects we worked on was a study measuring the biomass of Ascophyllum on the coast of the Schoodic Peninsula. To do so we sampled along 30-meter transects in the intertidal, counting the number of Ascophyllum thalli in half-meter quadrats, looking for other algae and some key invertebrates, and weighing the Ascophyllum. This last part was new to me, and a lot of fun. It involved dividing the masses of Ascophyllum into as many as three bundles, wrapping it all up in a net like a burrito, and weighing the burrito using a hand-held metric scale.

Three people wearing yellow high-visibility vests kneeling among algae in the intertidal
Left to right: Sally, Alex, and Valerie weighing Ascophyllum at Frazer Point in Acadia National Park
2022-06-17
© Allison J. Gong

Clearly, Ascophyllum nodosum makes up the vast majority of biomass along this coastline. There are some other rockweeds in the genus Fucus, a bit of sea lettuce (Ulva sp.), and that's about it. But the lack of diversity doesn't mean the intertidal doesn't have its own sort of spartan beauty. The lead for this project, Maya, described Ascophyllum as having a Van Gogh effect in the landscape. It didn't take long to see what she meant. Check it out:

Ascophyllum nodosum at Frazer Point in Acadia National Park
2022-06-17
© Allison J. Gong

and

Ascophyllum nodosum at Frazer Point in Acadia National Park
2022-06-17
© Allison J. Gong

There are, of course, many types of beauty in the natural world. What I saw in the intertidal at Acadia wasn't at all like what I'm used to seeing on the Pacific coast, but I wouldn't say it is any less beautiful. The variation in color between new growth and the older parts of the Ascophyllum thalli makes for gorgeous patterns as the thalli drape over cobbles.

Besides, any morning in the intertidal is a good morning! I certainly wasn't going to complain.

2 thoughts on “Earthwatch 2: Project ASCO

  1. Richard Sigman

    Hi Allison, Great article and pics! I downloaded ASCO data from the AnecData website for use in a multiple-regression homework problem I assigned my statistics students. In the HW instructions, I included a link to this article for info and pics about the ASCO data collection. Consequently, you may see more reads of this article in Oct/Nov. ... Richard Sigman (also an Earthwatch Team 1 volunteer)

    Reply
    1. Allison J. Gong

      Hi Richard! Thank you for letting me know that you enjoyed the post. It's terrific that you're using the ASCO data for your stats students. I hope all is well with you.

      Reply

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