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Yesterday I had the great fortune to visit a new intertidal site. It can be accessed only by crossing private property. The property owner is my next-door neighbor, and he said I can visit any time. As I said, lucky me! The site is a little north of Pigeon Point, and at first glance the terrain is not very different from Pigeon. But I could tell that it a site that is rarely, if ever, visited by humans. It just had that look of being mostly undisturbed. Yesterday's marine layer was low, making for dark skies and pretty lousy light for picture-taking, so I had to try something new.

This site has a lot of lovely pools and channels to explore, and at this time of year the water is very clear, which does make for good picture-taking. Halosaccion glandiforme, one of the charismatic red algae, is more abundant here than at other sites, and in the pools it grows quite a bit taller than it does on the rocks.

Here's what it looks like on the tops of the rocks. This is a cluster of young thalli. The tallest of these "bladders" is about 4 cm tall. Note that they are about 2/3 full of water, with a large air space at the top.

Many olive-green spherical and ovoid bladders, attached to rock.
Young Halosaccion glandiforme thalli along the San Mateo County coast
2022-08-14
© Allison J. Gong

The really cool thing is what happened when I stuck the camera in the water and took a shot. I got something like this:

Two elongate olive-green bladders, filled about 2/3 with water, submerged in a tidepool
Halosaccion glandiforme and other algae submerged in a tidepool
2022-08-14
© Allison J. Gong

I got a little carried away. But don't things look interesting from the turban snail's perspective?

Olive-green towers rising from a carpet of pink algae. A black snail is nestled between a trio of the towers.
Halosaccion glandiforme and a black turban snail (Tegula funebralis) in a tidepool
2022-08-14
© Allison J. Gong

I'm kind of enraptured by these towers of algae.

Olive-green towers rising from a carpet of pink algae.
Halosaccion glandiforme in a tidepool
2022-08-14
© Allison J. Gong

But the best part of these experiments was the reflections on the surface of the water. Check it out.

Olive-green towers rising from a carpet of pink algae.
Halosaccion glandiforme in a tidepool
2022-08-14
© Allison J. Gong

And this is the money shot! I just love how this turned out.

Olive-green towers rising from a carpet of pink algae in the bottom half of the image. The same tower are reflected in the top half of the image.
Halosaccion glandiforme in a tidepool
2022-08-14
© Allison J. Gong

This was a super fun morning. I'm looking forward to visiting this site again, when the light is better. When the daylight low tides return in a few months they will be in the afternoon. I anticipate some fantastic light shows in these pools and channels. I'll be teaching most afternoons by then, but will get out as often as I can.

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Some organisms, like some people, have a charisma that just can't be explained. For me, the sea palm (Postelsia palmiformis) has always been one such organism. Maybe part of its charm is the fact that it's not very common; it lives on rocky outcrops on exposed outer coasts, which aren't the easiest places to get to.

See? That's a clump of Postelsia way out there in the center of the photo.

Rocks covered with olive-green seaweeds in the foreground and ocean in the midground, under a cloudy sky
Algae-covered rocks in the intertidal at Pigeon Point
2022-08-13
© Allison J. Gong

The tide was pretty good (-0.9 feet) so I figured it was worth working my way out there. I had a wishlist of critters to collect, but they would be pretty easy to find, and I had time to spend in the low intertidal. The algae are still going strong, although I did see some signs of senescence in some of the reds. The Postelsia, on the other hand, were in great shape.

Group of palm tree-shaped olive-green seaweeds attached to a rock in the intertidal.
Small stand of sea palms (Postelsia palmiformis) at Pigeon Point
2022-08-13
© Allison J. Gong

Despite its beautiful olive-green colors, Postelsia is a brown alga in the phylum Ochrophyta. It is in the same order (Laminariales) as the large canopy-forming kelps Macrocystis pyrifera and Nereocystis luetkeana. However, Postelsia gets to be only about a half-meter tall. It has a thick, flexible stipe and a cluster of thin blades at the top of the stop, which give it the palm tree appearance. Postelsia's hapterous holdfast does what it says on the label—it hangs on tightly to the rock. In fact, the rock often fails before the holdfast does, and when Postelsia washes up onto the beach it often has bits of rock (or mussel or whatever) still in the grip of the holdfast.

And it turns out that Postelsia is one of the many photogenic seaweeds. This morning it was doing the '80s hair band thing. Especially when photographed from the vantage of a front-row groupie.

Postelsia palmiformis rocking the joint at Pigeon Point
2022-08-13
© Allison J. Gong

So that's the organism that captured and held my attention this morning. The algae don't get nearly the appreciation they deserve, even among fans of the rocky intertidal. Maybe shining a light on them once in a while is something I can do to fix that.

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