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Since 2000 the first Saturday in May is Snapshot Day in Santa Cruz. This is a big event where the Coastal Watershed Council trains groups of citizen scientists to collect water quality data on the streams and rivers that drain into the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, then sets them loose with a bucket of gear, maps, and data sheets. The result is a "snapshot" of the health of the watershed. As we did last year, my students and I were among the volunteers who got to go out yesterday and play in coastal streams. This year there were 13 (+1) groups sent out to monitor ~40 sites within Santa Cruz County. For reasons I don't entirely understand four sites in San Mateo County (the county to the north along the coast) were included in this year's sampling scheme; hence the +1 designation. Since I routinely haunt the intertidal in this region I took the opportunity to become more familiar with the upstream parts of the county and volunteered to sample at these northern sites. It just so happened that I was teamed with two of my students, Eve and Belle, for yesterday's activities.

Of our four sites, two were right on the beach and two were up in the mountains. Thus our "snapshots" covered both beach and redwood forest habitats. Here are Belle and Eve at our first site, Gazos Creek where it flows onto the beach:

Beel and Eve at Gazos Creek, our first site. 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Belle and Eve at Gazos Creek, our first site.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

After heavy rains the water draining through the watershed breaks through the sand bar and the creek flows into the ocean. Yesterday the sand bar was thick and impenetrable, at least to the measly amount of rain we'd had in the past 24 hours.

Gazos Creek as it flows onto the beach. After rains it breaks through the sand bar and flows into the ocean. 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Gazos Creek as it flows onto the beach. After rains it breaks through the sand bar and flows into the ocean.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

At each site we collected two water samples, for nutrient and bacteria analyses, and the following field measurements:

  • air and water temperature
  • electrical conductivity
  • pH
  • dissolved oxygen (DO)
  • water transparency
Snapshot Day data sheet for 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Snapshot Day data sheet for our Gazos Creek (forest) site.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Here Eve is measuring conductivity in Gazos Creek (beach site):

Eve takes a conductivity measurement at Gazos Creek (beach site). 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Eve takes a conductivity measurement at Gazos Creek (beach site).
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Most of the equipment we used to take the field measurements was simple and straightforward: pH strips and a thermometer, for example. Even the conductivity meter was easy to use. You just turn it on, let the machine zero out, and stick it in the creek facing upstream so that water flows into the space between the electrodes. Here's Belle taking a conductivity measurement at our Gazos Creek (forest) site:

Belle measures conductivity at our Gazos Creek (forest) site. 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Belle measures conductivity at our Gazos Creek (forest) site.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

The only tricky field measurement was the one for dissolved oxygen (DO). This involved collecting a water sample (easy enough), inserting an ampoule containing a reactive chemical into the sample tube, breaking off the tip of the ampoule so that water flows into the tube, and gently mixing the contents of the ampoule for two minutes. Then you compare the color of the ampoule with a set of standards in the kit to estimate the DO level in mg/L (=ppm).

Standards for measuring dissolved oxygen. 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Standards for measuring dissolved oxygen.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Our second and third sites were up in the mountains, at Old Woman's Creek and Gazos Creek (forest). With all the rain we had over the winter the riparian foliage has exploded into green. It was all absolutely lush and glorious. How lucky we were to spend the day in such surroundings!

Gazos Creek in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Gazos Creek in the Santa Cruz Mountains.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong
Gazos Creek in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Gazos Creek in the Santa Cruz Mountains.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

And there were a great many banana slugs! All of them were solid yellow, with no brown spots. At one point there were so many slugs that we had to be extremely careful not to step on them.

Banana slug (Ariolimax sp.) in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Banana slug (Ariolimax sp.) in the Santa Cruz Mountains.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong
Banana slug (Ariolimax sp.) in the Santa Cruz Mountains. 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Banana slug (Ariolimax sp.) in the Santa Cruz Mountains.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Our fourth and final site was Whitehouse Creek, which flows into the Pacific Ocean to the south of Franklin Point. We had about a 10-minute hike to the creek from the road. By that point it had been raining for quite a while. Although we were protected from the rain by the trees when we were up in the forest, when we walked out to the field to the beach we were lucky it had eased to a light sprinkle.

Whitehouse Creek where it flows into the Pacific Ocean. 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Whitehouse Creek where it flows into the Pacific Ocean.
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

After we finished our sampling we all agreed that we had to have gotten the most picturesque sites. None of the other teams got to visit both forest and beach for their sampling! We didn't drop off our samples and equipment until 14:00, a couple of hours later than the other groups, but who would complain about having getting to spend the day tromping through the forest AND the beach?

Our feet! 7 May 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Our feet!
7 May 2016
© Allison J. Gong

In recent years, citizen science has become a very important provider of biological data. This movement relies on the participation of people who have an interest in science but may not themselves be scientists. There is some training involved, as data must be collected in consistent ways if they are to be useful, but generally no scientific expertise is required. The beauty of citizen science is that it allows scientists and science educators to share the experience of discovery with people who might not otherwise know what it's like to really examine the world around them. I think it is a great step towards creating a less science-phobic society, one in which science informs policy on scientific matters.

LiMPETS stands for "Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students." The program seeks both to give students experience doing real science and to establish baseline and long-term ecological data for California's sandy shores and rocky intertidal areas. As an intertidal ecologist myself, I naturally wanted my students to participate in the rocky intertidal monitoring.

The LiMPETS coordinator for Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties is a woman named Emily Gottlieb. She and I decided to have my class monitor the site at Davenport Landing. Emily came to class two weeks ago to train the students in identifying the relevant organisms and recording the data.

Practice tidepooling, training for real-life monitoring in the intertidal. 15 April 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Practice tidepooling, training for real-life monitoring in the intertidal.
15 April 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Tidepooling is easy and comfortable when you do it inside a classroom seated at a table. But today was all about the real thing. It was overcast and breezy when we met up with Emily at 09:30 and headed out to the site. At first the students seemed to be a little skeptical about the whole thing.

Students get their first look at their morning workplace. 29 April 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Students get their first look at their morning workplace.
29 April 2016
© Allison J. Gong

We were extremely fortunate to be joined this morning by Dr. John Pearse, Professor Emeritus of Biology at UC Santa Cruz, one of my graduate advisors, and the founder of LiMPETS. Dr. Pearse has been monitoring some sites, including this one at Davenport Landing, since the 1970s. He is THE person to talk to about intertidal changes in California over the past 40 years.

Years ago John set up permanent transect lines and plots at Davenport Landing, marking the origin of each transect with a bolt. The first thing we had to do when we got to the site was find the bolt. Then John ran out the transect line to the lowest point that students could work safely, given the conditions of tide and swell; this happened to be about 15 meters.

Dr. John Pearse runs out the vertical transect line. 29 April 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Dr. John Pearse runs out the vertical transect line.
29 April 2016
© Allison J. Gong

For the vertical transect, 1/2-meter square quadrats were placed at each meter. Some organisms were counted as individuals and others were marked as either present or absent in each of the 25 small squares within each quadrat. Emily gave the students their assignments and data sheets, and they spread out along the transect line.

Students working the vertical transect. 29 April 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Students working the vertical transect.
29 April 2016
© Allison J. Gong
LiMPETS sampling 29 April 2016 © Allison J. Gong
LiMPETS sampling
29 April 2016
© Allison J. Gong
LiMPETS sampling 29 April 2016 © Allison J. Gong
LiMPETS sampling
29 April 2016
© Allison J. Gong
LiMPETS sampling 29 April 2016 © Allison J. Gong
LiMPETS sampling
29 April 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Aside from the experience of learning how to do this kind of data collection, I hope the students understand what a privilege it is to have been in the field with John Pearse. He has such a thorough understanding of the intertidal that he is a treasure vault of knowledge. Here he is explaining what owl limpets are all about:

Dr. John Pearse explains what owl limpets are and how to find them. 29 April 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Dr. John Pearse explains what owl limpets are and how to find them.
29 April 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Interestingly, we didn't find many owl limpets. And certainly not any of the big ones that I see all the time at Natural Bridges. John said that this is one of the differences between a protected area (Natural Bridges) and an unprotected one (Davenport Landing). Collecting is not allowed at Natural Bridges, and the owl limpets are left unmolested--by humans, at least--to grow large (10+ cm long is not uncommon). On the other hand, people do collect at Davenport and I've heard it said that owl limpets are good to eat; today we saw fewer than a dozen owl limpets and they were all small, none larger than 3 cm long.

The sun came out after a while, but the wind also picked up. The tide came up as well, and some of the students got more than a little wet. Overall they were real troopers, though, and I didn't hear much complaining. Next week is the last lab of the semester, and we'll be participating in another citizen science project. But that's a tale for another day.

I did take advantage of the beautiful setting to have one of Emily's LiMPETS volunteers (and a former student of mine!) take our class photo. Here we are, the Bio 11C class of 2016!

Class photo, taken at Davenport Landing. 29 April 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Class photo, taken at Davenport Landing.
29 April 2016
© Allison J. Gong

2

For as long as sentient humans have walked across the surface of the planet, they have observed the world around them. Quite often these observations had direct life-or-death consequences, as most of survival had to do with finding food while not becoming someone else's dinner. Fast forward a few million years and we find ourselves mired in technology, often interacting with the outside world through some sort of digital interface. And yes, I totally get the irony of writing that statement in a blog. Be that as it may, I've found that people generally don't pay much attention to what's going on around them. My job as a biology professor is to teach some of the forgotten skills of the naturalist, including the practice of observation.

Today I took my Ecology students birdwatching. We looked at other things, of course, but birds were the primary focus of today's observations. We started the day near the mouth of Elkhorn Slough in Moss Landing, where we were immediately challenged to identify some shorebirds. Fortunately we had a guest lecture from a seabird biologist yesterday, and she gave us some important clues to help us with our field IDs.

Some shorebirds are fairly easy to identify, such as this long-billed curlew (Numenius americanus). It was foraging in a stand of pickleweed just off the road, which is the only reason I was able to take a decent photo of it.

Long-billed curlew (Numenius americanus) at Elkhorn Slough. 18 March 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Long-billed curlew (Numenius americanus) at Elkhorn Slough.
18 March 2016
© Allison J. Gong

We also saw marbled godwits (Limosa fedoa), willets (Tringa semipalmata), as well as the flocking "peeps," which we never got a really good look at but all agreed might have been sanderlings (Calidris alba).

One of the things we had been warned about was the difficulty of identifying gulls. There are some features that help when the birds are in adult breeding plumage, but gulls go through several juvenile plumages before attaining their adult colors and there's a lot of phenotypic overlap among species. Case in point:

Gulls (Larus spp.) on Moss Landing State Beach. 18 March 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Gulls (Larus spp.) on Moss Landing State Beach.
18 March 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Some of these adults are western gulls (Larus occidentalis) but some look different (smaller bodies, different beak coloration). They might be sub-adult westerns or another species entirely. And even the birds in juvenile plumage varied a lot; some were speckled or mottled while others were more uniformly colored. Several birds (not in this photo) had pale gray backs and pale tan flanks. According to my field guide, National Geographic's Field Guide to the Birds of North America, there are several species that have this plumage in their second or third winter. We kind of gave up on the gulls, but to be honest we didn't have a lot invested in identifying them.

The highlight of the beach part of the field trip, at least for me, was seeing snowy plovers (Charadrius nivosus). These tiny birds are perfectly colored to hide in the sand, and unless they move they are almost impossible to see. I found them because we unwittingly wandered too far up the beach towards the dunes and accidentally flushed them from their divots in the sand.

Snowy plovers (Charadrius nivosus) at Moss Landing State Beach. 18 March 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Snowy plovers (Charadrius nivosus) at Moss Landing State Beach.
18 March 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Can you spot all four plovers in this photo? Here's another quartet:

Snowy plovers (Charadrius nivosus) at Moss Landing State Beach. 18 March 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Snowy plovers (Charadrius nivosus) at Moss Landing State Beach.
18 March 2016
© Allison J. Gong

This morning I saw my first humpback whale of the season. A couple of whale watching boats were lingering around the mouth of the harbor, which should have clued us in that there was something going on. However, it took a kayaker to tell us that there were breaching humpbacks just off the jetty before we realized. And I call myself a naturalist? Sheesh.

This bird is, I think, a third-winter western gull (L. occidentalis).

Western gull (Larus occidentalis) at Elkhorn Slough in Moss Landing, CA. 18 March 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Western gull (Larus occidentalis) at Elkhorn Slough in Moss Landing, CA.
18 March 2016
© Allison J. Gong

This species is endemic to the California Current, which means that it is found nowhere else. The pink legs are characteristic of western gulls, and the black on the tip of the bill indicates a third-winter bird. Adults have a red spot towards the end of the bill but not on the very tip. If you look closely you can see that this bird has a tiny bit of red immediately proximal to the black smudge.


After lunch we convened at the Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve visitor center, across the highway and inland a bit from our morning site. The students got a 30-minute orientation to the history and geography of the Slough, then we went on a hike.

Orientation to the Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve. 18 March 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Orientation to the Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve.
18 March 2016
© Allison J. Gong

The first leg of the hike was a short walk to what is appropriately called the overlook. This is where I gave the students their only real assignment of the day. They had to spend 10 minutes in silent observation. They could write in their notebooks and look around with binoculars, but they were not allowed to talk at all. With some groups this is a nigh-impossible feat, but these students did a fantastic job. After the 10-minute observation period we discussed what they had seen and heard. One student said he heard 26 bird calls, but didn't know how many of them were the same bird making different calls. Others mentioned the sounds of human activity--traffic on the highway, planes flying overhead, the beep-beep-beep of a truck in reverse--as well as the buzz of insects and birds. I asked if anyone else had noticed the shadow of a turkey vulture that flew directly over us.

Silent observation period at Elkhorn Slough. 18 March 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Silent observation period at Elkhorn Slough.
18 March 2016
© Allison J. Gong

I think this is a very valuable exercise and would like to extend this period of silent observation to 15 or 20 minutes for future classes. In a lot of ways class always feels a little frantic, and to slow down and simply be a part of nature is a luxury of time that many of us don't have. Alas, we had other places to visit on the hike and needed to get moving again.

Turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) in flight over Elkhorn Slough. 18 March 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) in flight over Elkhorn Slough.
18 March 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Much of Elkhorn Slough used to be a dairy, and the Slough is still surrounded by agricultural fields. There are two barns on the Reserve, named Big Barn and Little Barn. Little Barn is used for equipment storage and isn't open to the public, but you can walk into Big Barn. There are two barn owl boxes in Big Barn. We searched under them for owl pellets; we didn't find any intact pellets but did see some that had been dissected by previous human visitors.

Little Barn (foreground) and Big Barn (background) at Elkhorn Slough. 18 March 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Little Barn (foreground) and Big Barn (background) at Elkhorn Slough.
18 March 2016
© Allison J. Gong

I don't think I've ever seen this much green at Elkhorn Slough. All of the El Niño rains have brought forth a lot of wildflowers and grasses. We hiked past a large stand of non-native poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) on our way to Big Barn. That stuff is going to be difficult to eradicate, as it spreads quickly and outcompetes native species. And yes, this plant is highly toxic to mammals and was, in fact, used by the ancient Greeks for human executions (including that of Socrates).

When we returned to the visitor we asked the Reserve's naturalist, Jane, to take our picture. So this is class photo #1 of the semester. It's not complete, as three students were absent today. I hope to get a picture of the entire class another day.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I wanted to take the students to the woodpeckers' acorn granary, but we didn't have time to hike that far. Spring break is coming up week after next, and I think I'll go back to the Slough to say "hello" to the family of acorn woodpeckers. I'm looking forward to having more time than I do at the moment to play outdoors. I want to do some drawing, too!

One of the best things about teaching is the opportunity to keep learning. Case in point: yesterday I attended an all-day teacher training session for the LiMPETS program, so that I can have my Ecology students participate in a big citizen science project in the rocky intertidal later this spring. In the Monterey Bay region LiMPETS is organized and run out of the Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History, where yesterday's training took place. LiMPETS has two ongoing citizen science projects, one looking at populations of mole crabs (Emerita analoga) on sandy beaches and the other monitoring population of several invertebrate and algal species on rocky shores. Of course, my interests being what they are I signed up for the rocky intertidal monitoring project.

We spent the morning learning about the history of the program and how to identify the organisms that are monitored, then after lunch went out to Point Pinos to collect some data and work through the process that we need to teach to our students. The day before we'd had a high surf advisory on the coast, and yesterday the swell was still big. We hiked out to the study site and set up the transect line, which runs from the top of a rock through the entire range of tidal heights to the low intertidal.

LiMPETS study site at Point Pinos. 6 February 2016 © Allison J. Gong
LiMPETS study site at Point Pinos.
6 February 2016
© Allison J. Gong
One of our instructors, the intrepid Emily, sets the transect line. 6 February 2016 © Allison J. Gong
One of our instructors, the intrepid Emily, sets the transect line.
6 February 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Where Emily is standing is about 10 meters along the transect line. The monitoring protocol calls for sampling at every meter on the transect. One of the other teachers, Phaedra, and I were the only ones wearing hip boots, so we volunteered to work at the lowest spot. We thought we'd start with the 10-meter quadrat and hopefully get down to the 11-meter quadrat once the tide receded a bit more. Then we got hit by a few big waves and decided that discretion is the better part of valor and gave up. It was a pretty easy decision to make, especially after the quadrat got washed away and we had to go fetch it when the waves brought it back.

Field gear. 6 February 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Field gear.
6 February 2016
© Allison J. Gong

All told the group collected eight quadrats of data. We had a little time to poke around (i.e., take pictures) before heading back to the museum for data entry.

A gorgeous chiton! 6 February 2016 © Allison J. Gong
A gorgeous chiton! I don't know which species it is.
6 February 2016
© Allison J. Gong
Codium fragile, a filamentous green alga. 6 February 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Codium fragile, a filamentous green alga.
6 February 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Codium is an interesting alga. These cylindrical structures are composed of many filaments, which in turn contain multi-nucleate cells. Yes, the cells contain multiple nuclei. Codium fragile has the common name "dead man's fingers," I suppose because. . . well, I actually have no idea. As far as I can tell they don't feel anything like a dead man's fingers, or the way I imagine a dead man's fingers would feel.

There were quite a few empty abalone shells scattered among the rocks. As we were hiking out I found this shell. When I tried to pick it up I found that it was still alive, and well stuck to the rock. This is a very good sign, as the black abs have been suffering from withering syndrome, in which the animal gradually loses its ability to hang on.

Haliotis cracherodii, the black abalone, wearing a few barnacle friends. 6 February 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Haliotis cracherodii, the black abalone, wearing a few barnacle friends.
6 February 2016
© Allison J. Gong

All in all, this workshop was a lot of fun. If I have to give up an entire Saturday to do training, it couldn't get much better than spending at least part of it in the intertidal. And Point Pinos is such a fabulous intertidal site that I certainly wouldn't turn down an opportunity to explore there again.

On a misty, cool Friday I took my Ecology students up the coast a bit to Rancho del Oso, the nature center at the ocean end of Big Basin Redwoods State Park, which was the first state park in California. It was our first field trip of the semester, and goal was to get outdoors and start observing patterns in nature. The weather forecast called for a 50% chance of rain, but we lucked out and got the other 50% and had only light drizzle to contend with.

We spent the morning wandering through the woods. Even though visibility wasn't great there was a lot to see close at hand. For example, I've always loved how a lowly spider web looks when the silk has collected beads of dew:

Orb web in the morning mist, Rancho del Oso. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Orb web in the morning mist, Rancho del Oso.
29 January 2016
© Allison J. Gong
Orb web at Rancho del Oso. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Orb web at Rancho del Oso.
29 January 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Am I the only person who has a favorite tree? I don't mean a favorite species or type of tree, but a favorite individual tree. Mine is an oak, and it isn't at all difficult to find, just a few meters up the trail leading from the nature center to Waddell Creek. Oak trees in general are my favorite trees in California, and this one is a magnificent specimen. One of the things I love about these coastal live oaks (Quercus agrifolia) is the way that the mature tree's branches grow all gnarled and reach along the ground. They have such character and seem so wise.

Coastal live oak (Quercus agrifolia) at Rancho del Oso. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Coastal live oak (Quercus agrifolia) at Rancho del Oso.
29 January 2016
© Allison J. Gong

If you climb up to the tree and look through it over the ridge there's a fantastic view into Big Basin Redwoods State Park. Today the view was obscured by fog, but even so it was pretty spectacular, almost eerie.

Rancho del Oso is at the bottom of the Skyline-to-the-Sea trail, which starts up in the redwoods at the top of the park. Waddell Creek flows through the park, under Highway 1, and empties into the Pacific Ocean. Strong afternoon winds in the spring and summer make Waddell Beach is a very popular spot for kitesurfers.

Fog has a way of turning a technicolor world into black and white:

View of Pacific Ocean from Rancho del Oso. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
View of Pacific Ocean from Rancho del Oso.
29 January 2016
© Allison J. Gong

Fog also makes for difficult bird watching; on the other hand it brings certain other wildlife out of hiding:

Banana slug (Ariolimax sp.) at Rancho del Oso. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Banana slug (Ariolimax sp.) at Rancho del Oso.
29 January 2016
© Caitlin Sorkhabi, used with permission

and:

California newt (Taricha torosa) at Rancho del Oso. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
California newt (Taricha torosa) at Rancho del Oso.
29 January 2016
© Caitlin Sorkhabi, used with permission

Can't you see the determination of this little newt in its posture? They are single-minded when it comes to getting from here to there. The nature center has put up "Newt Crossing" signs to slow down the motorists. Driving slowly won't keep a newt from getting squished if it is run over, of course, but it does help drivers see the newts so they DON'T get run over.


After lunch we crossed the highway and went down to the beach. The National Weather Service had put out a high surf advisory, and the waves were big. I'd guess that they were about 3x my height. There was also a lot of foam blowing over the beach.

Some of the foam made very interesting iridescent bubbles on the sand and various bits of flotsam washed up on the beach:

Sea foam at Waddell Beach. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Sea foam at Waddell Beach.
29 January 2016
© Allison J. Gong
Sea foam at Waddell Beach. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Sea foam at Waddell Beach.
29 January 2016
© Allison J. Gong
Sea foam at Waddell Beach. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Sea foam on driftwood at Waddell Beach.
29 January 2016
© Allison J. Gong

There were some really fascinating patterns in the sand. I wasn't the only person who noticed and appreciated them.

Sand at Waddell Beach. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Sand at Waddell Beach.
29 January 2016
© Allison J. Gong
Sand and rocks at Waddell Beach. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Sand and rocks at Waddell Beach.
29 January 2016
© Allison J. Gong

And lastly, we found a Strange Object. It was a white, oblong Object high on the beach, and it squeaked a bit, much like a dog's chew toy does, when I stepped lightly on it--obviously it was hollow.

The Strange Object we found at Waddell Beach. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
The Strange Object we found at Waddell Beach.
29 January 2016
© Caitlin Sorkhabi, used with permission

Curiosity piqued, I borrowed a knife from a student and cut it open. The Object had the texture of a marshmallow, but was considerably tougher. It was about 4 mm thick. And on the inside there were remnants of what looked like formerly living animal tissue:

Interior of the Strange Object we found at Waddell Beach. 29 January 2016 © Allison J. Gong
Interior of the Strange Object we found at Waddell Beach.
29 January 2016
© Caitlin Sorkhabi, used with permission

What was this Strange Object? Well, I don't know. My first thought was that it might be the empty shell of an animal that had hatched out of it. However I can't think of what local creature might hatch out of an egg this size and of this consistency. Birds have calcified egg shells . . . this Object wasn't calcified. Some reptiles have leathery eggs . . . but what local species of reptile, marine or otherwise, would hatch out of an egg this size? And the "shell" of this thing was thick, much thicker than an egg shell would be, as egg shells need to allows respiratory gases pass between the embryo and the external environment.

So, call me flummoxed. Do you have any idea what this Object could be? If you do, let me know in the comments.

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