$hit happens

Very early in the morning of Sunday 12 August 2018, the F/V Pacific Quest ran aground near Long Marine Lab. I found out about it because the lab facilities manager sent out a global e-mail telling us that a boat had wrecked and telling us that the seawater pumps had been turned off just in case the boat leaked any fuel or oil. The e-mail came through at about 06:00h. By the time I got to the lab at 10:30 the pumps had been turned back on. After I made sure all of my animals were okay, I moseyed over to the cliff to see what I could see.

The tide was coming in, to a high of 5 feet at 12:42h. The captain had dropped an anchor before leaving the boat after it got stuck on the reef ledge, which kept it from drifting away and becoming a hazard to other vessels on the water. The rising tide had lifted the boat from the ledge to land between the ledge and a small rock island. The swells picked up the boat, but the hull had been damaged and she was taking on water. The captain was the only person on the boat, so there was no loss of human life in this incident.

The F/V Pacific Quest, shipwrecked at Long Marine Lab
12 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

The F/V Pacific Quest, shipwrecked at Long Marine Lab
12 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

The swells were continually breaking over the bow, flooding the cabin and washing flotsam off into the ocean.

The F/V Pacific Quest, shipwrecked at Long Marine Lab
12 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

A Vessel Assist boat was there when I arrived and was stationed just inside the kelp bed. They put two guys into the water, who swam to the Pacific Quest and attempted to attach a tow line.

12 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

Ultimately, however, they decided that conditions were too dangerous for the Vessel Assist boat to tow away the Pacific Quest. The hull had been breached and the boat had taken on a lot of water, making her too heavy to be towed safely. Besides, the Pacific Quest is a 65-foot fishing boat, making her about twice as long as the small Vessel Assist boat. The two guys swam back out to the rescue boat and they drove away.

Meanwhile the tide continued to rise, and the Pacific Quest was clearly floating, albeit listing to port and heavy in the bow. I think that if she hadn’t been anchored to the shore she would have floated away. Could she have been safely towed away at this point? I don’t know. I do know that no other actions were taken to try to remove her.

I returned in the late afternoon for the high low tide, and it was clear that the boat was resting on the sand between the ledge and the small island. The continued bashing against the rock had put a big dent in the starboard side, no doubt worsening the hull breach.

The F/V Pacific Quest, shipwrecked at Long Marine Lab
12 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

With the boat stationary on sand, a salvage crew finally started taking action. They removed the remaining debris from the deck, including the fuel tank from the inflatable zodiac, and attached some lines.

Salvage crew aboard the shipwrecked F/V Pacific Quest
12 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

Salvage crew aboard the shipwrecked F/V Pacific Quest
12 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

Someone had determined that although the hull had been breached the fuel tanks were undamaged and were unlikely to release any diesel fuel or other oil into Monterey Bay. At the end of the day yesterday the plan was for the salvage crew to tie the boat down and keep her from drifting away after the evening high tide, and start pumping off the fuel at low tide this morning. Then the salvagers could work on removing the boat itself. I couldn’t figure out exactly how they would remove the boat, but hey, I’m only a marine biologist, not a marine salvager. As long as the fuel tanks didn’t rupture, things would be juuuuust fine.

So much for plans. The caretakers reported smelling diesel fumes at 21:30h last night, and shut down the seawater intake pipes. Turns out the boat had broken up during the rising tide, with at least one fuel tank ruptured. Fortunately, if that’s a word that can be used in this situation, the shipwreck is downstream from the seawater intake. The pumps were shut down for a few hours this morning and we’re on short rations, but there doesn’t seem to be a significant amount of diesel in the seawater system.

I was working the low tide this morning and had an appointment afterward, so I didn’t get to the lab until about noon. The boat was well and truly broken up by then, into two large pieces and a great many smaller ones. The pieces of wood, plastic, and fiberglass were already dispersing with the currents.

Flotsam from the shipwrecked F/V Pacific Quest
13 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

The F/V Pacific Quest, broken on the beach at Long Marine Lab
13 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

The good news is that the salvage crew had finally started pumping off the fuel remaining on the boat. As of 17:17 today the crew reports that they should be able to offload all of the fuel before the next high tide tonight. With any luck, they’ll be able to finish the job and we can carry on as usual without anymore seawater interruptions. At this point I don’t know what plans, if any, are in place to remove the boat parts on the beach. The various organizations at the marine lab are parties of interest, but none have the responsibility of cleaning up this mess. We just have to live and work with it.

Life preserver from the shipwrecked F/V Pacific Quest
12 August 2018
© Allison J. Gong

UPDATE: As of 19:00h on Monday 13 August 2018 all fuel has been pumped out of the Pacific Quest. The major risk of chemical pollution into Monterey Bay has been abated. The next stage of recovery is the retrieval of debris from the beach and ocean.

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