The hunt concludes

Day 3 (Saturday 25 March 2017): Highway 25

We spent our second night on the coast in Morro Bay and came home via Highway 25. I would have enjoyed a drive up the coast, but given the road closures in Big Sur that wasn’t a possibility. Highway 25, however, proved to be a very pretty drive. It was nice to see wildflowers closer to home, too.

Almost all of the hills sported bright yellow patches, some denser than others. At first I thought they were goldfields, but as we got closer I could see that the color was too bright and lemony to be goldfields, and the plants proved to be wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis). Mustard is widely considered a weed in California. Its native habitat is the Mediterranean basin, and one hypothesis is that it arrived in California with the Franciscan friars who established missions up and down the state. Mustard is one of the first plants to bloom every spring, and it covers hillsides, agriculture fields, and the side of the road.

Scenery along Highway 25
25 March 2017
© Allison J. Gong

Scenery along Highway 25
25 March 2017
© Allison J. Gong

Highway 25
25 March 2017
© Allison J. Gong

For the first time in several years the oak trees appear to be flourishing this spring. There was a lot of rain this past rainy season, and it’s such a relief to see the trees coming back to life. I’d forgotten what it is like to see so much green in a California landscape. I mean, just look!

Oak trees along Highway 25
25 March 2017
© Allison J. Gong

Unfortunately for us, most of the land through which Highway 25 winds is private owned, which means we couldn’t just wander off on some back road to get closer to the wildflowers. We did happen upon some lupines which were growing conveniently along the side of the road. These were the big purple bush-type lupines. They were not growing in any kind of park or protected area, so I tossed a couple of sprigs into the plant press.

Lupine (Lupinus sp.) along Highway 25
25 March 2017
© Allison J. Gong

25 March 2017
© Allison J. Gong

By this time the light was fading as the sun began to set behind the western hills, so we headed home. I made it through three days of riding in the car without having a panic attack, which is much better than my concussed brain could have managed a few months ago. All in all it was a great trip, made even better because we got to spend some time with friends and family. These superblooms don’t occur every year, and I’m very glad that I was able to see some of this one.

If you’re considering making a trip to see the wildflowers in the desert areas of southern California, stop thinking about it and just go! If you can spare even a single night away, you will see some awesome displays of Nature’s majesty. And it won’t last much longer, so go now. Don’t worry so much about actual destinations; just keep your eyes open for blooms wherever you can see them and be prepared to travel off the beaten path, because the flowers could be anywhere.

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